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SCHÖNHEIT AUS PFLANZEN

Ein globaler Trendsetter

Der Markt für Naturkosmetik wächst unaufhaltsam. Zu dieser Kenntnis kommt eine Initiativstudie des deutschen Salber-Institus. Für jüngere Konsumenten und Männer seien jedoch zu wenig ansprechende Produkte im Angebot, sodass bei den grossen und bekannten Marken Entwicklungsbedarf herrsche.

Kleinere Hersteller könnten diese Marktlücken zu ihren Gunsten nutzen. Dieser Meinung ist auch Drogistin Astrid Thurner von der Drogaria Surses in Savognin: «Immer mehr Kunden stehen vor den Regalen und suchen nach wirksamer Naturkosmetik.» Hintergrund der wachsenden Nachfrage sei die Suche nach Einfachheit und natürlichen Wirkstoffen.

  • Laut Thurner würden die Leute viel von der Naturkosmetik erwarten. «Kunden wollen, dass Falten vermindert werden, eine gesunde Haut erhalten bleibt, dass die Produkte gut riechen und keine Hautirritation auslösen.» Synthetische Inhaltsstoffe würden vor allem in der dekorativen Kosmetik einen Sinn machen. Denn Schminkprodukte wie Lippenstift und Lidschatten würden mit natürlichen Rohstoffen nicht so lange auf der Haut haften, und zudem dürfen sie nicht in die Haut eindringen. Schönheit aus Pflanzen ist also gefragter denn je, doch welches Potenzial steckt dahinter? «Ein sehr grosses», sagt die Drogistin, «denn die Natur kann alles, und sie verfügt über grosse Ressourcen.» Gute Beispiele dafür sind die Aloe-Vera-Pflanze, welche die Haut mit genügend Feuchtigkeit versorgt, die Avocado und das Jojobaöl, welche genügend Fettsäuren und perkutan wirkende Vitamine für das Gesicht haben. Heilerde und Ringelblumen wiederum sind gut gegen Rötungen, und die Kamille hilft bei Entzündungen. Die Wildrose versorgt die Haut mit ätherischen Ölen und das Edelweiss mit Gerbstoffen und Vitaminen. Laut Thurner gibt es für jedes Kosmetikprodukt – egal, ob Gesichtscreme oder Hautlotion – die idealen Rohstoffe aus der Natur. «In der Naturkosmetik ist es wie beim Essen, je mehr man gesunde Nährstoffe zu sich nimmt, desto besser ist es für das Wohlbefinden.»
    «Ich denke, die Nachfrage nach Naturkosmetik wird auch weiter wachsen», eine kleine Lücke gebe es aber dennoch, «bei den Naturkosmetikprodukten für Männer besteht eindeutig noch Verbesserungspotenzial.»

  • Laut Thurner würden die Leute viel von der Naturkosmetik erwarten. «Kunden wollen, dass Falten vermindert werden, eine gesunde Haut erhalten bleibt, dass die Produkte gut riechen und keine Hautirritation auslösen.» Synthetische Inhaltsstoffe würden vor allem in der dekorativen Kosmetik einen Sinn machen. Denn Schminkprodukte wie Lippenstift und Lidschatten würden mit natürlichen Rohstoffen nicht so lange auf der Haut haften, und zudem dürfen sie nicht in die Haut eindringen. Schönheit aus Pflanzen ist also gefragter denn je, doch welches Potenzial steckt dahinter? «Ein sehr grosses», sagt die Drogistin, «denn die Natur kann alles, und sie verfügt über grosse Ressourcen.» Gute Beispiele dafür sind die Aloe-Vera-Pflanze, welche die Haut mit genügend Feuchtigkeit versorgt, die Avocado und das Jojobaöl, welche genügend Fettsäuren und perkutan wirkende Vitamine für das Gesicht haben. Heilerde und Ringelblumen wiederum sind gut gegen Rötungen, und die Kamille hilft bei Entzündungen. Die Wildrose versorgt die Haut mit ätherischen Ölen und das Edelweiss mit Gerbstoffen und Vitaminen. Laut Thurner gibt es für jedes Kosmetikprodukt – egal, ob Gesichtscreme oder Hautlotion – die idealen Rohstoffe aus der Natur. «In der Naturkosmetik ist es wie beim Essen, je mehr man gesunde Nährstoffe zu sich nimmt, desto besser ist es für das Wohlbefinden.»

    «Ich denke, die Nachfrage nach Naturkosmetik wird auch weiter wachsen», eine kleine Lücke gebe es aber dennoch, «bei den Naturkosmetikprodukten für Männer besteht eindeutig noch Verbesserungspotenzial.»


    suedostschweiz .ch - Datum: 06.11.2011, 00:00 Uhr


Organic skincare, why bother?

Nicola Elliott set up an organic cosmetics company in 2005 to provide a luxury alternative to organic skincare products that sometimes have a rather worthy image. She is convinced that organic is best for skin. Here she explains why.

Nicola says, 'One of the main reasons I use organic skin care is the plain fact of harmful chemicals being in so many beauty products, and the effects they have on your skin.

'According to new estimates, your skin can absorb up to 60% of substances - that's into your bloodstream. And the average woman is using over 250 chemicals every day on her skin.

'Many synthetic product manufacturers include 'penetration enhancers' to allow the chemicals to absorb deeper into the skin - so to many consumers, that sounds great: that the product is sinking deep into the skin. But in fact, this level of absorption means the chemicals eventually could go into the kidneys and liver, and (depending how long you use them) for decades. Nobody really knows about the cumulative effects of this long-term use.'

We'd all love to avoid ingesting unnecessary chemicals, but at the same time, we want products that actually work. How can you make sure your natural or organic skincare products will do some good?

Nicola advises, 'Choose cleverly and, wherever possible, go for what is actually natural AND organic. Watch out for labels that boast 'natural ingredients' or products 'inspired by nature' - this means nothing - a product only needs to have 1% natural ingredients in it to be allowed to call itself 'natural'.

'Nature really does offer up some of the most beneficial, gorgeous things to use on our skins - oils, butters, essences, herbs, fruit and leaf extracts. It's crazy not to use what is out there, wherever possible in its purest form. And believe me, your skin will thank you for it.'

Zest – Tue, Oct 18, 2011 10:21 BST


Expert urges women to switch to organic makeup

Ladies have been encouraged to condense their makeup bags as purchasing numerous similar items can not only be cluttering but also expensive.
This is according to EcoSalon writer Kristen Arnett, who urged individuals to move away from traditional products and look at organic cosmetics.
She explained how downsizing beauty kits is a wise idea during times of financial hardship and offers the perfect time to move away from chemical-enhanced makeup.
"I have hopes that each of you will take the time to find more natural and organic makeup to put on your face," Ms Arnett stated.
The eco-beauty expert described how there are plenty of green alternatives on the market and these allow women to look good without exposing themselves to chemicals.
Ms Arnett encouraged ladies to purchase one good-quality example of each staple item rather than lots of versions.
Foundation, bronzer, mascara, eye pencil and concealer are considered by many women to be must-have beauty products.
Posted by Claire Thomson
Ladies have been encouraged to condense their makeup bags as purchasing numerous similar items can not only be cluttering but also expensive.
This is according to EcoSalon writer Kristen Arnett, who urged individuals to move away from traditional products and look at organic cosmetics.
She explained how downsizing beauty kits is a wise idea during times of financial hardship and offers the perfect time to move away from chemical-enhanced makeup.
"I have hopes that each of you will take the time to find more natural and organic makeup to put on your face," Ms Arnett stated.
The eco-beauty expert described how there are plenty of green alternatives on the market and these allow women to look good without exposing themselves to chemicals.
Ms Arnett encouraged ladies to purchase one good-quality example of each staple item rather than lots of versions.
Foundation, bronzer, mascara, eye pencil and concealer are considered by many women to be must-have beauty products.
mypure.co.uk - by Claire Thomson

Fashion: Get gorgeousness the natural way

organic-cosmeticsTRANSFORMING yourself into a natural beauty is not quite what it sounds.

We are not talking about the no make-up look but a chemical-free cosmetics regime.

Much of the traditional, some might say dowdy looking packaging of organic products has been replaced with a huge variety of colourful new organic ranges. But the labels can be just as confusing for consumers.

A US environmental group recently filed a lawsuit against 26 cosmetic companies over claims their products were falsely labelled ‘organic’.

But in Britain, the rules aren’t as cut and dried. There’s currently no legal definition as to what constitutes an organic product, leaving natural novices baffled.

The answer is to do what you would do with food. Read the labels.

It’s crucial to read before you buy as a brand can flaunt its product as organic even if it contains a tiny drop of lavender oil alongside a long list of chemical nasties.

In a saturated market without regulation, the Soil Association estimates that UK sales of certified organic health and beauty products dipped by 23% to £27.7million last year, thanks to people buying items billed as natural, rather than the certified real thing.

Angela Young, founder of 100% Organics (www.100percentorganics.com), said: “The term ‘organic’ often receives a bad reaction because it’s been used cynically to push prices up and take advantage of a lack of knowledge about an emerging industry.’’

Navigating natural products is easy when you know how. Quash the chemical overload for Organic Month this September and give natural beauty the green light with our guide.

CHEMICAL CLASH

According to Angela: “Skincare is only a tiny drop of the daily blast of chemicals we come into contact with, but it’s a good place to start.

“Our body absorbs all of the products that we put on our skin and it really matters what’s in them.”

In beauty terms, think of your organic content as a percentage. The higher the percentage, the more natural the product.

There are a number of companies which produce 100% organic products but these usually tend to be oil-based.

You might assume water is as pure as you can get but there’s no organic standard for H2O so no product containing it (a large majority) can be classed as 100% organic.

But, however confusing, going organic does have its benefits.

Angela added: “Following years of skin problems I discovered that I was actually reacting to many of the ingredients found in everyday, chemical-filled products. Since using organic, my skin has improved immensely.”

Hidden nasties like phthalates, petrochemicals and nano-particles are all potentially harmful ingredients that are best avoided, but certain types of products struggle to compete with their non-organic competitors.

Clio Turton from the Soil Association said: “Haircare is one due to the fact that most conventional hair products will use silicones or some other material to add gloss and shine, so it can be hard for certified products to compete on a like-for-like basis.”

SHELF SWITCHOVER

There’s no need to overhaul your current bathroom shelf to make way for an all-organic routine.

If you’re a beginner, go green gradually and focus on cutting down the amount of chemicals your skin is absorbing. Try replacing your current products with something more organic or natural as each item runs out, like a moisturiser one month and a lip balm the next.

Alan MacKenzie, founder of Organic Surge, said: “Natural and organic products work best when used as a regime, so if you’re going for organic skincare, I’d recommend changing your cleansing and moisturising routines at the same time.”

.


The latest developments in cosmetics law

The latest developments in cosmetics law
September 01 2011
Nanomaterials
Japanese cosmetics
Labelling of 'natural' cosmetics
Cosmetovigilance
AFSSAPS annual report
UV filters in sunscreen products
Endocrine disrupters
Cosmetics law will soon change significantly in all EU member states with the introduction of the EU Cosmetic Products Regulation (1223/2009), which will replace the EU Cosmetics Directive (76/768/EEC) from July 11 2013. The industry is already under pressure to prepare for the regulation's entry into force. In France, cosmetics manufacturers face additional pressures in the form of calls to control the labelling of products that claim to offer 'added value' and to focus more on product safety.
The Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS) has also publicly stated, on numerous occasions, that it already expects cosmetics placed on the French market to meet most of the Cosmetic Products Regulation's requirements.
This update summarises the latest developments in cosmetics law and explains how the industry can best protect its interests when placing cosmetic products on the French market.
Nanomaterials
Nanotechnologies are a key topic in the Cosmetic Products Regulation. Significantly, the regulation acknowledges that current information on the risks associated with nanomaterials is 'inadequate', and thus imposes specific obligations in this regard.(1)
This view is shared by AFSSAPS, which on June 14 2011 released a report on the toxicity of nanomaterials (specifically, titanium dioxide and zinc oxide) contained in cosmetic products, and more precisely on their power to penetrate cutaneous tissue.(2) The report concludes that the available data is still insufficient to determine whether a risk of cancer is associated with the use of nanoparticles in cosmetic products. Moreover, according to AFSSAPS, there are no relevant up-to-date studies on nanomaterials in cosmetic products.
For these reasons, AFSSAPS recommends that further scientific studies be conducted. This should be closely monitored by cosmetics manufacturers, given that the French media tends to link nanomaterials with asbestos. For example, the French media suggests that nanomaterials are the 'future asbestos', and therefore that employees in the cosmetics industry should already be subject to protective measures. Since most cosmetics are used daily, the impact on consumers, as well as any complaints made by them, should also be considered. The French authorities hope that early warnings about the potential damaging effects of cosmetics containing nanomaterials will assist them to build a case against the industry if their concerns prove well founded.
Japanese cosmetics
On April 22 2011 the General Directorate for Health and Consumer Protection asked AFSSAPS to assess the risks arising from cosmetic products imported from Japan, as well as the raw materials of which they are composed, since the March 11 2011 nuclear accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. In an opinion dated July 6 2011(3) AFSSAPS stated that, thus far, no contamination of non-food products has been detected in France.
However, AFSSAPS noted that pursuant to Article R1333-2 of the Public Health Code, it is forbidden to add intentionally radionuclides to consumer products, and this prohibition also covers cosmetics under Article R1333-4 of the code. AFSSAPS also considered that the notion of an 'acceptable level of risk' cannot apply to cosmetics, and that the authorised levels for foodstuffs and water intended for human consumption are not appropriate.
In conclusion, AFSSAPS emphasised that the person placing the product on the market is responsible for ensuring that there is no contamination. Producers, importers and other persons responsible for placing a product on the market must make available to AFSSAPS inspectors the following information on raw materials:
the harvest date, date of manufacture or conversion;
their source, if they originated from the prefectures mentioned in EU Regulation 297/2011, which imposes special conditions on the import of feed and food originating in or consigned from Japan following the Fukushima accident; and
for any products originating from the prefectures mentioned in the regulation, analyses from a laboratory accredited by the Japanese authorities confirming that there is no contamination.
Labelling of 'natural' cosmetic products
In France, 'natural' cosmetics are not governed by any specific regulation or legal regime. Hence, there are no stipulated conditions that must be met in order for 'added-value' labelling or advertising claims to be made with regard to 'natural' cosmetics.(4) However, this situation will soon improve, since it has been announced that a legal standard on natural cosmetics will be established and industry standards unified. French authorities and manufacturers will play a key role in this process with the aim of addressing increased competition from outside the European Union, especially from the Middle East, Asia and Latin America.
Creating a legal standard on natural cosmetics
The Cosmetic Products Regulation provides that "the Commission shall, in cooperation with Member States, establish an action plan regarding claims used and priorities for determining common criteria justifying the use of a claim".
By July 11 2016, the European Commission will submit to the European Parliament and the Council a report regarding the use of claims on the basis of the common criteria adopted. This cooperation was initiated through the creation of two working groups under the auspices of the European Committee for Standardisation and the EU Directorate General for Health and Consumer Policy.
In September 2010, in response to a question from the European Parliament, the European Commission specified that the criteria should be finalised by the second half of 2011 and should take effect from 2012.(5)
In February 2011 the European Commission decided to wait for the recommendations of the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) before finalising the criteria. The ISO, through its Technical Committee 217 (in which 34 countries, including France, took part), is developing a new legal standard on the terminology of 'natural' and 'organic' cosmetics, which should be launched after 2013.(6)
Unification of industry standards
The proliferation of private standards has been criticised many times as a source of legal uncertainty. However, unification is on its way through the Cosmetic Organic and Natural (Cosmos) standard AISBL. The leading certification bodies in Europe – Certified Natural Cosmetics (Germany), the Professional Association for Ecological and Organic Cosmetics (France), the Certification Body for Sustainable Development (France), the Ethical and Environmental Certification Institute (Italy) and the Soil Association (United Kingdom) – have created a common standard intended to replace the five existing national standards. Cosmos-standard certified natural products will be labelled with the 'COSMOS NATURAL' logo and will bear the seal of the Cosmos-standard member organisation.
Under the standard's description,(7) there is no requirement to use a minimum amount of organic ingredients, but certified products may indicate the percentage of organic ingredients by weight (of the total product, without water and minerals). No organic claims (for either the ingredients or the percentages) can be made on the front of the packaging. Furthermore, the use of nanomaterials, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and animal testing is forbidden. The process for applying for certification was opened in February 2011.
However, this launch has not put an end to the discussion. Studies show that fierce competition still exists between different certifications, especially between those of the European Union and the United States. Emerging economies, on the other hand, are not focusing on this issue. In the meantime, the number of companies claiming to manufacture 'natural' cosmetics is increasing daily. The French authorities have regularly warned the European Union that such intense competition and uncertainty need to end in order to protect consumers and competitiveness.
Cosmetovigilance
A 2010 review of adverse effects of cosmetics reported to AFSSAPS was released on July 11 2011.(8) According to this review, the number of adverse effects reported has steadily increased since 2004. For example, 219 reports were submitted to AFSSAPS in 2010, compared to only 104 reports in 2004. Thirteen percent of the notified risks were deemed serious, as 16 accidents required hospitalisation and one was life threatening. The most widely reported effect was an allergic reaction (57%), and adult women were the demographic most likely to be exposed to such risks (71%). The products that are most frequently the subject of adverse effect reports are:
sunscreens (57 reports);
body care products (23 reports);
make-up products and make-up removers (23 reports);
face creams (16 reports);
hair dye products (15 reports); and
temporary tattoos (14 reports).
AFSSAPS specified that it is actively involved in the European Commission working group on serious undesirable effects established in 2010 under Article 23 of the Cosmetic Products Regulation, regarding the implementation of a harmonised cosmetovigilance system at the European level. In addition, it is drafting complaint forms for:
responsible persons (Article 4) and distributors; and
competent authorities of EU member states, which will help them to share information on the cosmetics concerned.
Moreover, AFSSAPS will soon launch its Serious Undesirable Effects Reporting Guidelines.
AFSSAPS annual report
On July 25 2011 AFSSAPS released its annual report for 2010.(9) Once again, the agency highlighted that cosmetics are marketed without prior authorisation, and that therefore compliance with safety requirements is the responsibility of the person that places the products on the market.
Regarding the monitoring of the cosmetics market in 2010, AFSSAPS carried out 152 checks of cosmetic products and 28 instances of non-compliance were found. These mostly concerned perfumes and sunscreens. Four out of 13 authorisations for clinical trials concerning cosmetic products were granted.
At the European level, AFSSAPS's involvement in improving the safety of cosmetics has continued. AFSSAPS has submitted many opinions and scientific reports on dangerous substances, such as those classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic for reproduction (CMR agents), henna, tooth-bleaching products and permanent hair dyes.
In preparation for the implementation of the new Cosmetic Products Regulation, AFSSAPS is drafting:
guidelines on the safety assessment that must be included in the new product information file (Articles 10 and 11 of the regulation);
an action plan regarding claims (Article 20); and
a unique central reporting system for cosmetics (Article 13).
These topics are still under discussion, but the dedicated web portal for the notification of cosmetic products should be effective by January 11 2012 (Article 39, Paragraph 2).
UV filters in sunscreen products
Sunscreens generally protect against all dangerous ultraviolet (UV) radiation which can cause serious diseases such as skin carcinoma. One of these UV filters is benzophenone-3; this is listed in Annex VII of EU Directive 76/768/EEC, which relates to the UV filters that cosmetic products may contain (to be replaced by Annex VI of the Cosmetic Products Regulation, as from July 11 2013).
Benzophenone-3 is an endocrine disrupter which has caused concern over its potentially harmful effects since the publication of a 2008 report by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Products. The report recommended that benzophenone-3 should be limited to 6% in sunscreens and to 0.5% in all other types of cosmetic products, and not to a maximum of 10% as is currently permitted under the EU Cosmetics Directive.(10)
This view is supported by AFFSAPS's opinion issued on July 8 2011,(11) which recommends:
for adults, limiting the concentration of benzophenone-3 to:
6% in sunscreens; and
0.5% in all other cosmetic products; and
for children up to the age of 10, limiting concentrations of benzophenone-3 to below 6%.
Endocrine disrupters
On July 12 2011 a legislative report on endocrine disrupters was issued by the Parliamentary Office for Evaluation of Scientific and Technological Option. The report will inform the French National Assembly and Senate of scientific and technological options which will assist them in their decision-making process.
The study recommends, among other things:
encouraging research to increase the available scientific data;
opting for the precautionary principle in the event of doubt; and
implementing bans where necessary.(12)
The report highlights the real risks of endocrine disrupters in cosmetics (eg, may cause or exacerbate serious illnesses such as cancer). Notably, consumer warnings exist for parabens, although the report acknowledges that no serious evidence of danger has yet been put forward. However, this has not stopped the National Assembly from voting on the national prohibition of parabens and phthalates.(13)
Nanomaterials
Japanese cosmetics
Labelling of 'natural' cosmetics
Cosmetovigilance
AFSSAPS annual report
UV filters in sunscreen products
Endocrine disrupters
.
Cosmetics law will soon change significantly in all EU member states with the introduction of the EU Cosmetic Products Regulation (1223/2009), which will replace the EU Cosmetics Directive (76/768/EEC) from July 11 2013. The industry is already under pressure to prepare for the regulation's entry into force. In France, cosmetics manufacturers face additional pressures in the form of calls to control the labelling of products that claim to offer 'added value' and to focus more on product safety.
The Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS) has also publicly stated, on numerous occasions, that it already expects cosmetics placed on the French market to meet most of the Cosmetic Products Regulation's requirements.
This update summarises the latest developments in cosmetics law and explains how the industry can best protect its interests when placing cosmetic products on the French market.
.
Nanomaterials
Nanotechnologies are a key topic in the Cosmetic Products Regulation. Significantly, the regulation acknowledges that current information on the risks associated with nanomaterials is 'inadequate', and thus imposes specific obligations in this regard.(1)
This view is shared by AFSSAPS, which on June 14 2011 released a report on the toxicity of nanomaterials (specifically, titanium dioxide and zinc oxide) contained in cosmetic products, and more precisely on their power to penetrate cutaneous tissue.(2) The report concludes that the available data is still insufficient to determine whether a risk of cancer is associated with the use of nanoparticles in cosmetic products. Moreover, according to AFSSAPS, there are no relevant up-to-date studies on nanomaterials in cosmetic products.
.
For these reasons, AFSSAPS recommends that further scientific studies be conducted. This should be closely monitored by cosmetics manufacturers, given that the French media tends to link nanomaterials with asbestos. For example, the French media suggests that nanomaterials are the 'future asbestos', and therefore that employees in the cosmetics industry should already be subject to protective measures. Since most cosmetics are used daily, the impact on consumers, as well as any complaints made by them, should also be considered. The French authorities hope that early warnings about the potential damaging effects of cosmetics containing nanomaterials will assist them to build a case against the industry if their concerns prove well founded.
.
Japanese cosmetics
On April 22 2011 the General Directorate for Health and Consumer Protection asked AFSSAPS to assess the risks arising from cosmetic products imported from Japan, as well as the raw materials of which they are composed, since the March 11 2011 nuclear accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. In an opinion dated July 6 2011(3) AFSSAPS stated that, thus far, no contamination of non-food products has been detected in France.
However, AFSSAPS noted that pursuant to Article R1333-2 of the Public Health Code, it is forbidden to add intentionally radionuclides to consumer products, and this prohibition also covers cosmetics under Article R1333-4 of the code. AFSSAPS also considered that the notion of an 'acceptable level of risk' cannot apply to cosmetics, and that the authorised levels for foodstuffs and water intended for human consumption are not appropriate.
.
In conclusion, AFSSAPS emphasised that the person placing the product on the market is responsible for ensuring that there is no contamination. Producers, importers and other persons responsible for placing a product on the market must make available to AFSSAPS inspectors the following information on raw materials: the harvest date, date of manufacture or conversion;
their source, if they originated from the prefectures mentioned in EU Regulation 297/2011, which imposes special conditions on the import of feed and food originating in or consigned from Japan following the Fukushima accident; and
for any products originating from the prefectures mentioned in the regulation, analyses from a laboratory accredited by the Japanese authorities confirming that there is no contamination.
.
Labelling of 'natural' cosmetic products
In France, 'natural' cosmetics are not governed by any specific regulation or legal regime. Hence, there are no stipulated conditions that must be met in order for 'added-value' labelling or advertising claims to be made with regard to 'natural' cosmetics.(4) However, this situation will soon improve, since it has been announced that a legal standard on natural cosmetics will be established and industry standards unified. French authorities and manufacturers will play a key role in this process with the aim of addressing increased competition from outside the European Union, especially from the Middle East, Asia and Latin America.
.
Creating a legal standard on natural cosmetics
The Cosmetic Products Regulation provides that "the Commission shall, in cooperation with Member States, establish an action plan regarding claims used and priorities for determining common criteria justifying the use of a claim".
By July 11 2016, the European Commission will submit to the European Parliament and the Council a report regarding the use of claims on the basis of the common criteria adopted. This cooperation was initiated through the creation of two working groups under the auspices of the European Committee for Standardisation and the EU Directorate General for Health and Consumer Policy.
.
In September 2010, in response to a question from the European Parliament, the European Commission specified that the criteria should be finalised by the second half of 2011 and should take effect from 2012.(5)
In February 2011 the European Commission decided to wait for the recommendations of the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) before finalising the criteria. The ISO, through its Technical Committee 217 (in which 34 countries, including France, took part), is developing a new legal standard on the terminology of 'natural' and 'organic' cosmetics, which should be launched after 2013.(6)
.
Unification of industry standards
The proliferation of private standards has been criticised many times as a source of legal uncertainty. However, unification is on its way through the Cosmetic Organic and Natural (Cosmos) standard AISBL. The leading certification bodies in Europe – Certified Natural Cosmetics (Germany), the Professional Association for Ecological and Organic Cosmetics (France), the Certification Body for Sustainable Development (France), the Ethical and Environmental Certification Institute (Italy) and the Soil Association (United Kingdom) – have created a common standard intended to replace the five existing national standards. Cosmos-standard certified natural products will be labelled with the 'COSMOS NATURAL' logo and will bear the seal of the Cosmos-standard member organisation.
.
Under the standard's description,(7) there is no requirement to use a minimum amount of organic ingredients, but certified products may indicate the percentage of organic ingredients by weight (of the total product, without water and minerals). No organic claims (for either the ingredients or the percentages) can be made on the front of the packaging. Furthermore, the use of nanomaterials, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and animal testing is forbidden. The process for applying for certification was opened in February 2011.
However, this launch has not put an end to the discussion. Studies show that fierce competition still exists between different certifications, especially between those of the European Union and the United States. Emerging economies, on the other hand, are not focusing on this issue. In the meantime, the number of companies claiming to manufacture 'natural' cosmetics is increasing daily. The French authorities have regularly warned the European Union that such intense competition and uncertainty need to end in order to protect consumers and competitiveness.
.
Cosmetovigilance
A 2010 review of adverse effects of cosmetics reported to AFSSAPS was released on July 11 2011.(8) According to this review, the number of adverse effects reported has steadily increased since 2004. For example, 219 reports were submitted to AFSSAPS in 2010, compared to only 104 reports in 2004. Thirteen percent of the notified risks were deemed serious, as 16 accidents required hospitalisation and one was life threatening. The most widely reported effect was an allergic reaction (57%), and adult women were the demographic most likely to be exposed to such risks (71%). The products that are most frequently the subject of adverse effect reports are:
.
sunscreens (57 reports);
body care products (23 reports);
make-up products and make-up removers (23 reports);
face creams (16 reports);
hair dye products (15 reports); and
temporary tattoos (14 reports).
.
AFSSAPS specified that it is actively involved in the European Commission working group on serious undesirable effects established in 2010 under Article 23 of the Cosmetic Products Regulation, regarding the implementation of a harmonised cosmetovigilance system at the European level. In addition, it is drafting complaint forms for:
responsible persons (Article 4) and distributors; and
competent authorities of EU member states, which will help them to share information on the cosmetics concerned.
Moreover, AFSSAPS will soon launch its Serious Undesirable Effects Reporting Guidelines.
.
AFSSAPS annual report
On July 25 2011 AFSSAPS released its annual report for 2010.(9) Once again, the agency highlighted that cosmetics are marketed without prior authorisation, and that therefore compliance with safety requirements is the responsibility of the person that places the products on the market.
Regarding the monitoring of the cosmetics market in 2010, AFSSAPS carried out 152 checks of cosmetic products and 28 instances of non-compliance were found. These mostly concerned perfumes and sunscreens. Four out of 13 authorisations for clinical trials concerning cosmetic products were granted.
At the European level, AFSSAPS's involvement in improving the safety of cosmetics has continued. AFSSAPS has submitted many opinions and scientific reports on dangerous substances, such as those classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic for reproduction (CMR agents), henna, tooth-bleaching products and permanent hair dyes.
In preparation for the implementation of the new Cosmetic Products Regulation, AFSSAPS is drafting:
guidelines on the safety assessment that must be included in the new product information file (Articles 10 and 11 of the regulation);
an action plan regarding claims (Article 20); and
a unique central reporting system for cosmetics (Article 13).
These topics are still under discussion, but the dedicated web portal for the notification of cosmetic products should be effective by January 11 2012 (Article 39, Paragraph 2).
.
UV filters in sunscreen products
Sunscreens generally protect against all dangerous ultraviolet (UV) radiation which can cause serious diseases such as skin carcinoma. One of these UV filters is benzophenone-3; this is listed in Annex VII of EU Directive 76/768/EEC, which relates to the UV filters that cosmetic products may contain (to be replaced by Annex VI of the Cosmetic Products Regulation, as from July 11 2013).
Benzophenone-3 is an endocrine disrupter which has caused concern over its potentially harmful effects since the publication of a 2008 report by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Products. The report recommended that benzophenone-3 should be limited to 6% in sunscreens and to 0.5% in all other types of cosmetic products, and not to a maximum of 10% as is currently permitted under the EU Cosmetics Directive.(10)
This view is supported by AFFSAPS's opinion issued on July 8 2011,(11) which recommends:
for adults, limiting the concentration of benzophenone-3 to:
6% in sunscreens; and
0.5% in all other cosmetic products; and
for children up to the age of 10, limiting concentrations of benzophenone-3 to below 6%.
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Endocrine disrupters
On July 12 2011 a legislative report on endocrine disrupters was issued by the Parliamentary Office for Evaluation of Scientific and Technological Option. The report will inform the French National Assembly and Senate of scientific and technological options which will assist them in their decision-making process.
The study recommends, among other things:
encouraging research to increase the available scientific data;
opting for the precautionary principle in the event of doubt; and
implementing bans where necessary.(12)
The report highlights the real risks of endocrine disrupters in cosmetics (eg, may cause or exacerbate serious illnesses such as cancer). Notably, consumer warnings exist for parabens, although the report acknowledges that no serious evidence of danger has yet been put forward. However, this has not stopped the National Assembly from voting on the national prohibition of parabens and phthalates.(13)

Endnotes

(1) See "Nanotechnologies and Cosmetic Products: New Obligations and Legal Uncertainties" by Sylvie Gallage-Alwis and Pauline Blondet, ILO, February 3 2011.

(2) http://www.afssaps.fr/Afssaps-media/Publications/Rapports-Syntheses-Produits-cosmetiques-et-autres-produits-de-sante#folder_8246 (in French).

(3) http://www.afssaps.fr/Infos-de-securite/Points-d-information/Actions-de-l-Afssaps-pour-prevenir-tout-risque-de-contamination-dans-les-produits-utilises-en-France-suite-a-l-accident-nucleaire-de-Fukushima-Point-d-information (in French).

(4) See "The Legal Regime Governing the Marketing of 'Natural Cosmetics'" by Antoine de Brosses and Sylvie Gallage-Alwis, European Product Liability Review, December 2009, Issue 37.

(5) http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getAllAnswers.do?reference=E-2010-5442&language=EN

(6) See ISO/NP 16128 Cosmetics – Technical definitions and criteria for 'natural' and 'organic' ingredients and products.

(7) http://www.cosmos-standard.org/docs/COSMOS-standard_v1.1_310111.pdf

(8) http://www.afssaps.fr/Afssaps-media/Publications/Rapports-Syntheses-Produits-cosmetiques-et-autres-produits-de-sante#folder_8246 (in French).

(9) http://www.afssaps.fr/Afssaps-media/Publications/Bilans-Rapports-d-activite-Afssaps-publications-institutionnelles (in French).

(10) http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_risk/committees/04_sccp/docs/sccp_o_159.pdf

(11) http://www.afssaps.fr/Infos-de-securite/Points-d-information/Utilisation-de-la-benzophenone-3-dans-les-produits-cosmetiques-Avis-de-l-Afssaps-Point-d-information (in French).

(12) "Report on Endocrine Disrupters: Precautionary Step" by G Barbier, July 12 2011,http://www.senat.fr/rap/r10-765/r10-7651.pdf (in French).

(13) For more details on this national prohibition, see "Product Liabilities Litigation Rankings (March 2010–March 2011)" by Thomas Rouhette and Sylvie Gallage-Alwis, Option Droit & Affaires Litigation Rankings, June 1 2011.

International Law Office - September 01 2011


Naturkosmetik, Pseudo

bowlWer in Drogerien oder Kosmetikabteilungen steht, ist mit Produkten umringt, die sich an natürlichem Anschein übertreffen. Doch wie viel Natur steckt drin, wenn frische Früchte und Kräuter auf den Verpackungen locken? Nicht viel, wie unser Test ergab.


Kosmetik wird immer grüner", sagt Elfriede Dambacher vom Beratungsunternehmen Naturkosmetik-Konzepte. Denn der Verbraucher habe heute ein höheres Bedürfnis nach Gesundheit und Nachhaltigkeit. Und davon wollen auch die Hersteller, die bislang nur konventionelle Kosmetik angeboten haben, profitieren. "Die Hersteller testen dabei aus, wie viel Greenwashing über Positionierung und Werbung möglich ist", so Dambacher.

Selbst Experten der amtlichen Kontrolle stecken in einem Dilemma, wenn es darum geht, Irreführung in puncto Natürlichkeit bei Kosmetika zu kontrollieren. Es gibt zwar rechtliche Vorschriften zum Schutz vor Täuschung bei Kosmetika. Da im Gesetz aber "Natur" oder "natürlich" nicht definiert wurde, sind die Vorschriften für die Untersuchungsbehörden praktisch nicht umsetzbar.

Verschaukelt die Industrie hier den Verbraucher? Wir fragten beim Industrieverband Körperpflege- und Waschmittel (IKW) nach, was von der Grünfärberei bei Kosmetik gehalten wird. Für die Überwachung von Kosmetika seien die amtlichen Behörden zuständig, erklärte dazu Birgit Huber vom IKW. Eine Überprüfung, ob sich die Verbandsmitglieder an eine freiwillige Vereinbarung aus den Jahren 1992/93 halten, erfolge nicht. Diese Vereinbarung legt fest, dass Naturkosmetik ausschließlich aus pflanzlichen, tierischen und mineralischen Naturstoffen hergestellt ist und nur bestimmte Konservierungsstoffe enthält.

Dass ihre als grün ausgelobten Produkte nicht wirklich natürlich sind, ist den konventionellen Herstellern offenbar bewusst. Bei Schwarzkopf & Henkel habe man sich für die klassischen Aok-Produkte ganz bewusst gegen ein Naturkosmetikkonzept entschieden. Origins teilte mit, die Wirksamkeit sei wichtiger, man verzichte, soweit es geht, auf Chemiezutaten. Artdeco beabsichtigte mit der Serie Skin Yoga nur eine Annäherung an Natur. Die Serie Skin Yoga Biolab habe einen stärkeren Naturansatz und sei aufgrund des Trends "Natur" entstanden. Und The Body Shop stehe für von der Natur inspirierte Produkte. Ebenso vage äußerte sich Yves Rocher: Alle Produkte basieren auf Pflanzen und man baue auf synthetische Stoffe, wenn sie sicherer und effizienter sind.

Wie stark darf Natur verarbeitet werden?

Einen ganz anderen Aspekt bringt Martina Gebhardt zur Sprache. Die Unternehmerin bietet ein Sortiment aus rund 130 Produkten an. Im bayerischen Rott, zwischen Lech und Ammersee, produzieren 32 Mitarbeiter in einem denkmalgeschützten Bauernhof mit Seerosenteich und Alpenblick Martina Gebhardt Naturkosmetik. Nicht nur die Verarbeitung von ökologischen Rohstoffen ist hier Programm, sondern zudem sollen diese Zutaten so wenig wie möglich verarbeitet sein. "Auch in der Bio-Branche werden mittlerweile häufig nur noch isolierte Komponenten und stark verarbeitete, standardisierte Rohstoffe eingesetzt", kritisiert Gebhardt. Sie dagegen verwende etwa raffinierte Fette und Öle selten. Beim Wollwachs allerdings müssen Stoffe, die stark nach Schaf riechen, sowie Waschmittel, mit denen die Rohwolle gereinigt wurde, durch Raffination entfernt werden. Zudem kommt in ihren Produkten auch isolierter Cetylalkohol zum Einsatz. "Denn im Olivenöl schwankt der Gehalt mit der Ernte, daher fügen wir Cetylalkohol in geringen Gehalten zu." Ölauszüge, Alkoholtinkturen, Heiß- und Kaltwasserauszüge vieler Wurzeln, Kräuter und Blüten werden selbst angefertigt.

Der Verzicht auf standardisierte Rohstoffe macht die Cremes auch mal fester; Farbe und Duft können leicht schwanken. "Eine Traube schmeckt ja auch nicht immer gleich", so Gebhardt. Klar sei natürlich, das Produkt müsse sicher sein, es dürfe nicht in seine Bestandteile zerfallen und auch nicht schimmeln, obwohl auf Konservierungsmittel verzichtet wird.

Wir wollten nun wissen, wie viel Natur in "grüner" Kosmetik ohne NaTrue-, Demeter-, Ecocert- oder BDIH-Siegel, die für echte Naturkosmetik stehen, steckt. Deshalb kauften wir 34 Kosmetika mit "grünem Anstrich" ein und durchforsteten die Liste der Inhaltsstoffe nach chemischen und natürlichen Zutaten.

Das Testergebnis

Der grüne Etikettenschwindel ist gewaltig. Betroffen sind sowohl die klassisch konventionellen Hersteller wie Garnier oder Schwarzkopf & Henkel als auch Marken, die sich ganz eindeutig als grün darstellen, etwa Yves Rocher oder The Body Shop.

Nur eine Minidosis Natur: Von den insgesamt 59 enthaltenen Stoffen in der Biotherm Multi Recharge Ginseng-Gesichtspflege sind 28 rein chemisch, darunter UV-Filter, künstliche Farbstoffe oder Fette auf Erdölbasis. Den im Namen hervorgehobenen Ginsengextrakt findet man weit hinten in der Zutatenliste - noch hinter dem chemischen Konservierer Chlorphenesin, der in einer Maximaldosis von 0,3 Prozent eingesetzt werden darf. Da die Stoffe in absteigender Reihenfolge nach ihrem Anteil aufgeführt werden, aber Zutaten von einem Prozent und weniger in beliebiger Reihenfolge, ist von dem Ginsengextrakt nur eine Minidosis in der Gesichtscreme.

Colgate-Palmolive wirbt für die Palmolive Naturals Olive & Feuchtigkeitsmilch Cremedusche auf der Verpackung "mit Inhaltsstoffen 100 % natürlichen Ursprungs". Der Oliven- und Aloe-vera-Extrakt stecken aber nur in Spuren in der Duschcreme. Beide Naturstoffe stehen in der Zutatenliste hinter dem Konservierer Sodium Salicylate, der auf 0,5 Prozent in Kosmetika begrenzt ist.

Die PEG/PEG-Derivate in der Caudalíe Pulpe Vitaminée Creme für Augen und Lippen sollen auf Pflanzen basieren. Das dazu angewendete chemische Verfahren spielt aber in der Natur keine Rolle. Zudem werden PEG/PEG-Derivate mithilfe eines problematischen Ausgangsstoffs, der das Risiko einer Verunreinigung mit krebsverdächtigem Dioxan birgt, hergestellt.

Viele Marken duften mit künstlichen Verbindungen, etwa das Burt’s Bees-Produkt, die L’Occitane Rose 4 Reines Body Milk oder die mit großen Blumen bedruckten Duschgele von Crabtree & Evelyn oder Bronnley. Die Natural Soap von Nesti-Dante ist mit künstlichen Farbstoffen aufgepeppt, ebenso die Yves-Rocher-Gesichtscreme und die Körperbutter von The Body Shop.

Viele der eingesetzten synthetischen Stoffe sind umstritten und/oder bedenklich. Dazu gehören zum Beispiel Substanzen, die krebsverdächtiges Formaldehyd abspalten können.

Kompakt

Natur oder Chemie?

Eindeutig natürliche Stoffe

Eindeutig natürliche Stoffe sind "grün" in unserer Tabelle (siehe ab Seite 74). Hierunter fallen Pflanzenöle/-extrakte, unabhängig davon ob sie aus Öko-Anbau stammen oder nicht, mineralische Stoffe wie Titandioxid sowie Salze und Wasser. Zudem haben wir Stoffe wie Citric Acid, Hydrolyzed Sweet Almond Protein, Decyl Polyglucose, Xanthan Gum, Cera Alba, Fructose oder Algin als eindeutig natürlich bezeichnet.

Eindeutig chemische Stoffe

Chemische Stoffe sind "rot" in der Tabelle. Hierunter fallen künstliche Farbstoffe wie Tartrazin (CI 19140), synthetische Konservierungsstoffe wie Parabene, Silikone, Paraffine/Erdölprodukte, chemische UV-Filter sowie weitere rein chemische Zutaten mit ganz unterschiedlichen Funktionen in Kosmetika. Künstliche Duftstoffe sind Butylphenyl Methylpropional, Lyral und Methyl 2-octynoate; sie werden rein synthetisch hergestellt. Alpha-Isomethyl Ionone, Hydroxycitronellal und Hexyl Cinnamal kommen in natürlichen, ätherischen Ölen in so geringen Konzentrationen vor, dass bei nennenswerten, deklarationspflichtigen Gehalten ihre synthetischen Vertreter verwendet werden. Chemische Konservierungsstoffe wie Sodium Salicylate oder Benzoate, die auch in echter Naturkosmetik toleriert sind, haben wir nicht als Chemiestoffe erfasst, weil sie die Produkte stabil halten.

Die Grauzone

In Kosmetika stecken eine ganze Menge Zutaten, die sowohl aus pflanzlichen, aber auch aus petrochemischen Rohstoffen produziert werden können oder mit Verfahren, die nicht "natürlich" genug sind, weil sie etwa im Stoffwechsel von Pflanzen keine Rolle spielen. Dazu gehört unter anderem das sehr häufig eingesetzte Glycerin. Nur bei zertifizierter Naturkosmetik, die sich durch private Labelvergeber einer externen Kontrolle unterziehen, kann man sich darauf verlassen, dass Glycerin und Co. wirklich aus pflanzlichen Rohstoffen kommen.

Öko Test - Ratgeber Kosmetik, 16. September 2011


Nur wenige Shops konzentrieren sich auf „echt bio“

Naturkosmetik unter die Lupe genommen

Ökotest hat sich Natur-Kosmetikprodukte angesehen und ist zu dem Ergebnis gekommen, dass viele Lotionen, Cremes und Shampoos statt angeblich natürlicher Inhaltsstoffe tatsächlich viele künstliche und auch gesundheitsschädliche Zusammensetzungen beinhalten. Sie dürften daher keinesfalls als „Naturkosmetik“ bezeichnet werden.

Quintessenz der Aussage: Wer wirkliche Naturkosmetik kaufen will, sollte genau hinsehen und sich nicht durch den „grünen Anstrich“ der Verpackung des Produkts blenden lassen. Ganz eindeutig und ohne Trickserei funktionieren die Gütesiegel wie zum Beispiel „kontrollierte Naturkosmetik“ oder „Ecocert“ und „Natrue“: Wer darauf zurückgreift, kann sich sicher sein, dass dieses Pflegemittel ohne Erdölbasis auskommt und kein formaldehydhaltiges Konservierungsmittel enthält - wie es leider bei einigen getesteten Produkten der Fall war.


Marketing Claims of Natural & Organic Brands Fell Short of Expectations

According to a breakthrough research, several of the organic and natural cosmetic brands still exist to their marketing claims.

The Organic Monitor, who conducted the first-ever study of its kind, has evaluated more than fifty natural cosmetic brands distributed internationally and categorized them with regard to the naturalness of the products.

The study was identified as Brand Assessment, which engaged a contracted chemist inspecting the cosmetic products’ ingredient composition and categorizing their formulations looking upon the products’ level of naturalness.

Conventional cosmetics got the lowest rating of one, while certified organic cosmetics got the highest rating of between nine and ten. Pure natural cosmetics received a rating of five to seven and naturally inspired cosmetics got a rating of two.

The study’s most important finding is that most of the natural brands’ formulations are not meeting up with their marketing statements. A lot of companies that claim to have cosmetics that are chemically clean are essentially dropping unclean with ingredients of arguable synthetic. Those brands are recognized as naturally or semi-natural inspired, although they are claiming as 100% natural.

Unexpectedly, several brands of organic cosmetic are rated having low naturalness, even though their products included qualified organic ingredients, however, their formulations still contain synthetic ingredients but uncommon to organic and natural products.

The research has emphasized the certification significance in making a ‘level of playing field’ for companies. Standards for organic and natural cosmetic products have firm regulations on the prohibited and permitted ingredients and further promote green formulations. As a result, natural cosmetic brands that received high score in terms of its naturalness are those with high levels of certified products.

Health Talk & You - Beauty & Wellness on Aug 22, 2011


Infos zu Gütesiegel Natrue jetzt auch in Deutsch

Das internationale Gütesiegel Natrue, das für echte Naturkosmetik steht, hat jetzt auch einen Online-Auftritt in deutscher Sprache. Bislang gab es lediglich Informationen auf Englisch, informiert das Verbrauchermagazin Öko-Test 08/11. Unter der Adressewww.natrue.org finden Interessierte die Homepage und können dort die deutsche Sprache wählen. Unter dem Button „Produkte“ gebe es auf dieser Seite außerdem eine Liste mit zertifizierten Kosmetika.


Etikettenschwindel bei Naturkosmetik

Berlin  - Immer mehr Kosmetikhersteller vermarkten ihre Produkte mit „grünem Anstrich“. Mit Hinweisen auf natürliche Inhaltsstoffe setzen die Hersteller auf das gesteigerte Interesse der Verbraucher an Bio-Produkten. Nach einem Test des Verbrauchermagazins „Öko-Test“ sehen viele Kosmetika aber nur grün aus und enthalten in Wirklichkeit größtenteils chemische Inhaltsstoffe. „Grünen Etikettenschwindel“ gibt es auch in Apotheken.

Insgesamt testete das Magazin 34 Kosmetika, die ausdrücklich mit den Wörtern „Natur“ oder „Bio“ werben oder Pflanzen und Früchte auf ihren Verpackungen in den Vordergrund stellen. Die in den Produktinformationen erwähnten Inhaltsstoffe sortierten die Autoren nach den Kategorien „chemisch beziehungsweise künstlich“ und „natürlich“.

Von 36 Inhaltsstoffen der Crème „Olivenöl Nachtpflege“ von Dr. Theiss sind sieben chemisch, darunter Silikone und so genannte PEG-Derivate. Diese bergen laut Öko-Test das Risiko, mit dem krebserregenden Stoff Dioxan verunreinigt zu sein. In der „Deo Cream Sensitive Herbaderm“ von Rausch sind 10 von 27 Stoffen nicht natürlich: Künstliche Tenside oder Emulgatoren, Silikone, synthetische Konservierungsstoffe, sowie allergieauslösende künstliche Duftstoffe sind hier enthalten.

Die Hälfte aller 40 Stoffe in der Körperlotion „L'Occitane Rose 4 Reines“ waren chemisch. Außer PEG-Derivaten und Silikonen führt das Verbrauchermagazin auch Paraffine, bedenkliche UV-Filter sowie Propyl- und Butylparaben an. Die gleichen chemischen Zusätze wurden in „Nuxe Crème Fraiche Hydratisierende Emulsion“ gefunden. Der Hersteller wirbt mit dem Slogan: „Eine einzigartige Marke für Kosmetikprodukte auf natürlicher Basis“.

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Benjamin Rohrer, Freitag, 29. Juli 2011, 14:10 Uhr